The World Timeline
A glance at the World of the past, and an educated guess of the
World of the future.


Precambrian
Archaeozoic
5 billion years ago. The Earth's crust
is formed, green algae releases
oxygen into the atmosphere.
Proterozoic
2.5 billion years ago. Bacteria and
protozoans feed on the algae.









Palaeozoic
Cambrian
570 million years ago. The age of
marine invertebrates, shellfish and
urchins.
Ordovician
500 million years ago. Primitive fish,
seaweed and fungi emerge.
Silurian
425 million years ago. Shellfish are
dominant. Fungi have also evolved
into plants on land.
Devonian
405 million years ago. The Age of
fish prevails. The first true
amphibians form, along with insects
and some small animals.
Mississippian
345 million years ago. The age of
amphibians begins with shallow seas,
lowlands and fern-covered forests.
Pennsylvanian
310 million years ago. Warm
climate, swamps, coal forests, the
first reptiles evolve from amphibians.
Permian
280 million years ago. Coniferous
forests arise, a large number of
marine invertebrates go extinct.



Mesozoic
Triassic
230 million years ago. Active
volcanoes, the age of dinosaurs
begins.
Jurassic
190 million years ago. Mammals
emerge from small reptiles,
dinosaurs get larger.
Cretaceous
140 million years ago. The last of the
dinosaurs emerge. Placental
mammals emerge including early
primates.














Cenozoic
Tertiary
65 million years ago. The dinosaurs
are all gone, birds and mammals
take over. Time period divided into
epochs:
Palaeocene: 65 million years ago.
Age of small mammals, forests and
deserts paint the continents.
Eocene: 54 million years ago. The
dawn of recent life, high sea-levels,
island continents, large herbivores
emerge.
Oligocene: 38 million years ago.
Large herbivores dominate, which in
turn begins the emergence of
carnivorous mammals.
Miocene: 23 million years ago. The
continents settle as we know them
today. This is the longest epoch in
the Cenozoic.
Pliocene: 5 million years ago. The
first apes emerge. This is also the
age most modern mammals we
know today took root.
Quarternary
Begins 2 million years ago. Modern
days begin. Humans have evolved
from apes in the Pleistocene epoch
(the Ice Age) to today when humans
dominate the Earth.




Metazoic
Posthomic
Believed to be 14 million years
ahead. Humans are extinct, the age
of large mammals begins. Extensive
forests, very large trees, long-lived
fruiting and flowering plants, large,
swift-moving, highly-intelligent
mammals emerge and beat out most
modern mammals.
Thermocepian
Believed to be 60 million years
ahead. The last of the large, highly
intelligent mammals emerge. Large
continents collide together.
Era
Period
Features of
the Period