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Range: Peru to Bolivia.

Habitat: rocky outcroppings.

Size: HBL is about 15 inches. TL is equal. Size is about 10 pounds.

Character: These are small, burrowing animals that spend all their time in boulders and sheltering in caverns. They live in groups of up to 30 individuals with one lookout usually active and watching for predators. Of which aerial predators are the worst, such as predatory bats. But also they may be taken by mongooses, dogs and deinognathids. They are diurnal animals, the days are spent searching for food, and depending on the time of year, they also spend a lot of time mating and looking for partners. They are agile animals over their rocky home. The color provides protection, and band members recognize each other by their calls. They are omnivores, feeding on anything they can find, from grass, lichens and fungi to small insects, spiders, scorpions, centepedes, and bird eggs. A male may mate with several females per season. A single female may have as many as 10 babies in a litter. Sometimes more. Though if too many are born, the females may resort to eating some of the extra young. Babies that are raised to maturity are released from the group when they are 4 months old. They usually go off to join another group.

Range: south Amazonia.

Habitat: mountainous forests.

Size: HBL is about 15 inches. TL is about equal. Weight is about 10 pounds.

Character: In spite of the common name, this animal displays no real special features. The makeshift facial "mask" blends in with the rest of the coat. Like other Silvestoros species, this animal lives in large groups. Usually about 30 individuals. The social system of this animal is a little complex. Males make up the center core of the group. Young males may stay in the group, while females may move away to other groups. They are omnivores, with a wide menu of small items to feed on. Mostly vegetation, fungi, insects, and other invertebrates. Anything up to bird eggs. They are diurnal animals, feeding by day and roosting by night in small rocky caverns. They are agile animals, very sure-footed over the boulders, and rather fast moving animals. They communicate with each other mostly by calls. The calls consist mostly of barks, peeps and shrills. The barks are reserved mostly to alert the troup of the presence of predators. The worst predators are predatory bats, snakes, deinognathids, dogs and mongooses. A single male may have as many as 6 females, and a family group may have several mature males. Females breed once a year, and may have as many as 10 babies per litter. The babies are raised until they are about 4 months old.

Range: Peruvian Andes.

Habitat: rocky outcroppings.

Size: HBL is about 16 inches. TL is about equal. Weight is about 10 pounds.

Character: These small animals are much like other species of Silvestoros. The main distinguishing characteristic is the drab gray color and bright white belly. The back of the animal is adorned with darker gray stripes. They are diurnal animals. Their nights are spent in burrows or rocky caverns. Usually the roosting burrows are inhabited by several individuals. They are omnivores, feeding on anything that is available. Mostly grasses, weeds, plants, invertebrates and small mammals. Eggs are a favorite treat for these animals. They hunt by using mostly their senses of hearing and smell. Predators of these animals include Deinognathids, mongooses, foxes, bats, and snakes. These animals use loud barks to alert other members of their group of approaching danger. They are very fast movers over the boulders, and leap easily from one boulder to another. They breed once a year, males may have up to 6-8 females in his harem. A single female may have as many as 10 babies in a litter. She raises them until they are about 4 months old. The male babies are more likely to stay with the group, whereas females are more likely to move to another group.

Created by: White Hats Webworks